Archive | April, 2010

Getting past the Writer’s Block

23 Apr

I thought you would be interested in reading this excellent article by Mary Simmers.  It appeared in Worldwide Freelance Writer newsletter. Mary talks about how to trick your unconscious and gear it for writing by creating an enviornment which affirms that you are ready to take the plunge.

WRITING THE FIRST PARAGRAPH

When you’re stuck, you’re really stuck. You can’t even bring yourself to type a single word. If you depend on your writing for your livelihood, that can be disastrous. There has to be a better way than sitting down and waiting for the muse to visit, right? Well, there is.

It’s what I call “the ritual,” and it’s something every writer should come up with on their own. There’s no one pattern to the ritual. You make yours up. However, they all have one thing in common: they help you get writing even in the toughest of circumstances.

Some writers require a coffee and a biscuit to begin writing. Others might need to use a special chair to sit on. Mine? I just crinkle my eyebrows and get mad. No matter how far off my mind was just a minute ago, doing this lets me focus on the job at hand and get me putting words to paper.

If you haven’t identified a ritual that gets you into a writing headspace yet, here are a few ideas about what you can do:

  • Try deep breathing. Doing this calms the mind and relaxes the body. Oftentimes, that’s the prerequisite most writers need to get the writing bug to prick them ever so slightly.
  • Sweat it out. Do pushups, walk a few blocks or do chinups on the doorway. Sometimes, getting the blood circulating and the heart pumping can be the push needed to string your first sentence together.
  • Meditate. Grab one of those meditation books and try the most basic one. If this is your first time, it can be enough to clear your mind and jumpstart your gumption that you can’t wait but to get to the keyboard and begin typing.

Think about what you did when you wrote prolifically. What activities did you engage in? Did you eat pancakes with strawberry, watched a funny movie or played around with your English writing software? Chances are, you can use one of those as the ritual to get you to trigger your writing instincts.

About Mary Simmers
Read more: http://www.grammarsoftware.com/blog/writing-paragraph

Bookmark Getting past the Writer's Block

50 words to fame

16 Apr

Read below the story about how Social Networking Boosts Promotions in Corporate India where I was quoted in a Business Magazine ‘Corporate India’ .

Corporate India Magazine

Corporate India

Corporate India

How to Maintain a Portfolio

14 Apr

Just like a job interview, as a freelancer, getting your talent and experience in front of the decision makers is critical.
The key to creating a successful portfolio is to determine carefully what it is that you are able to offer that others can’t. Point your potential client’s attention to this characteristic of your work, all along making sure your portfolio is better than your competitors.
Full length or excerpts, chose them wisely. Displaying 10 of your best pieces of your best work promoted prominently is often better than displaying 50 good specimens.
If you are trying to showcase multiple services, you’ll have less success than promoting a few. You may consider using multiple portfolios. Adding ‘tags’ is another functional way to direct your potential clients to specimens of work they’d be particularly interested during evaluation.
If you are looking at freelancing as a serious career, I strongly suggest setting your own site, and having your portfolio there. SEO-maximize the website with samples of your work, testimonials from clients and case studies with references can greatly help you build your business.
Lastly, remember to include a list of publishing credits, which allow the potential client to get an idea of your experience and credentials. Just like a job interview, as a freelancer, getting your talent and experience in front of the decision makers is critical.
The key to creating a successful portfolio is to determine carefully what it is that you are able to offer that others can’t. Point your potential client’s attention to this characteristic of your work, all along making sure your portfolio is better than your competitors.
Full length or excerpts, chose them wisely. Displaying 10 of your best pieces of your best work promoted prominently is often better than displaying 50 good specimens.
If you are trying to showcase multiple services, you’ll have less success than promoting a few. You may consider using multiple portfolios. Adding ‘tags’ is another functional way to direct your potential clients to specimens of work they’d be particularly interested during evaluation.
If you are looking at freelancing as a serious career, I strongly suggest setting your own site, and having your portfolio there. SEO-maximize the website with samples of your work, testimonials from clients and case studies with references can greatly help you build your business.
Lastly, remember to include a list of publishing credits, which allow the potential client to get an idea of your experience and credentials.

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